WINTER KNITS: OUR TOP PICKS THIS SEASON

WINTER KNITS: OUR TOP PICKS THIS SEASON

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WINTER KNITS: OUR TOP PICKS THIS SEASON

As the nights draw in and the temperature drops, our focus inevitably shifts from shirts and sweats to that most winter of garments, knitwear. From luxurious merino to brushed lambswool, this season we have a huge selection of knits in store from brands such as YMC, Norse Projects, MHL by Margaret Howell, S.N.S. Herning, Folk and many more.

Injecting some much needed colour and pattern into the grey days that lie ahead is Folk’s Interference Crew. The British label have carved out a reputation for themselves for creating unique clothing with a contemporary twist and the Interference crew, using geometric layered weave, is a prime example of this.

For something a little subtler, we have the Sigfred Lambswool from Danish label Norse Projects. Creating products perfectly suited for Scandinavian winters, the Sigfred is their minimal take on a simple winter knit and has been constructed using 100% lambswool that features a soft, brushed handle. But it is the glacier blue colourway that really wins it for us.

French brand Armor Lux know a thing or two about creating hardwearing warm clothing having supplied Brittany’s sailors with knitwear since 1938. Our pick is their winter take on the classic Breton stripe, the Pull Martin Heritage Knit that has been cut from dense lambswool. Complimenting the navy, white and red colourway are four Armor Lux branded buttons and finishing things off are a regular fit, heavy crew neck collar and small Armor Lux patch logo located near the hem.

Shop our selection of winter knits in full over on our website now.

WINTER KNITS: OUR TOP PICKS THIS SEASON WINTER KNITS: OUR TOP PICKS THIS SEASON WINTER KNITS: OUR TOP PICKS THIS SEASON WINTER KNITS: OUR TOP PICKS THIS SEASON

SEE THE LATEST TENDER CO. COLLECTION

SEE THE LATEST TENDER CO. COLLECTION

SEE THE LATEST TENDER CO. COLLECTION

Artisan is a word that gets thrown around with carefree abandon these days, but in the case of Tender Co. it is an apt description of their manufacturing process. Working with small production numbers (often only a handful of pieces in any one style), the techniques used have not been scaled for mass manufacturing.

The result is hand cut garments, dyed in tiny quantities to exacting standards. This also allows founder William Kroll to experiment with techniques and methods that have long been forgotten by modern mass production methods. His use of unusual dyes and forgotten materials combine to create unique results in each collection he produces.

Take the Bound Hem Split Tail Shirt that has been made in England from a mixture of cotton and wool. It has been dyed using yellow ochre, a natural earth pigment that has been used by humans for tens of thousands of years. Its ancient origins can be traced back to the Neolithic period where it was an important part of warfare, ritualistic burial and cave paintings.

Kroll’s fascination for long forgotten pigments can also be seen in his use of Prussian blue for the Linen Folded Morning Coat. Utilised by van Gogh’ in his famous Starry Night painting, it is used in this case to provide a contrast between the horizontal stripes that make up the coat’s exterior. Delving deeper, the garment has been kitted out with two large circular drop pockets on the hips and copper rivets on the stress points.

Pigment dying techniques aren’t the only trick up Tender’s artisanal crafted sleeve; their leather goods are something very special too. The Wire Buckle Belt is a fine example of this as it has been constructed completely in England from oak bark and wattle tanned leather. This process took place at a tannery in Devon where leather has been produced, by largely unchanged methods, since Roman times.

Traditional oak bark tannage takes up to 18 months, during which time the hides are moved between increasingly stronger tan pits. The tannins in the oak bark slowly cure the skins and produce rich, dense leather that mellows and improves in character with age and use.

While smooth assembly line production might give cleaner, more perfect results, the “perfection of imperfection”, as Kroll calls it, can only be achieved through people making each item one by one. Each garment or product is the result of the maker’s skill.

SEE THE LATEST TENDER CO. COLLECTION SEE THE LATEST TENDER CO. COLLECTION SEE THE LATEST TENDER CO. COLLECTION SEE THE LATEST TENDER CO. COLLECTION SEE THE LATEST TENDER CO. COLLECTION SEE THE LATEST TENDER CO. COLLECTION SEE THE LATEST TENDER CO. COLLECTION SEE THE LATEST TENDER CO. COLLECTION SEE THE LATEST TENDER CO. COLLECTION

You can take a look at the complete Tender Co. collection in store and online now.

NEW BATTENWEAR COLLECTION

NEW BATTENWEAR COLLECTION

NEW BATTENWEAR COLLECTION

Combining his love of surfing & the outdoors, Battenwear is the brainchild of resident New Yorker Shinya Hasegawa. The latest collection has landed here in store and, as expected, it manages to blend styles as varied as military clothing and classic sportswear with Hagesawa’s distinctive flair.

One of the highlights for us is the Travel Shell Parka (above), a piece that has been crafted in the USA from a water repellant, durable 60/40 cloth. The khaki exterior features a multitude of pockets that have been paired with a tonal orange interior for a  smart look that harks back to the halcyon days of ’70s American outdoor hiking gear.

Another of our picks is the Warm-Up Fleece (below), a cosy number that comes in a natural colourway. The relaxed fit has been paired with raglan style sleeves, tonal cuffs and contrast pocket detailing. Two hip pockets and a zip fastened front complete the look.

We also love the sweats and accessories from the latest collection. The Reach-Up Sweatshirt is a style that returns each season, as do the Travel and Field Caps. You can take a look at the collection in full either in store or online now

NEW BATTENWEAR COLLECTION NEW BATTENWEAR COLLECTION NEW BATTENWEAR COLLECTION NEW BATTENWEAR COLLECTION NEW BATTENWEAR COLLECTION NEW BATTENWEAR COLLECTION NEW BATTENWEAR COLLECTION

PEGGS X ACE & TATE SUNGLASSES

PEGGS X ACE & TATE SUNGLASSES

PEGGS X ACE & TATE SUNGLASSES

We’re proud to announce that we have teamed up with Dutch based eyewear company Ace & Tate for an exclusive sunglasses collaboration.

Ace & Tate, a brand known for their premium acetate construction and high quality optics, have been producing bold, modern frames out of their Amsterdam based headquarters for many years now. We’re big fans of the sturdy feel that blends full UV protection with comfort.

For our collaboration we wanted to give an update to classic styles so we worked on two of their most iconic frames, the wayfarer influenced Allen and the rounded Byron. Both have a timeless look that suit a range of face types and we kitted out the Allen in a blond translucent colourway whilst the Byron comes in a dark tortoiseshell.

With dual branding on the inner arm, shop the exclusive collaboration either in store or online now…

PEGGS X ACE & TATE SUNGLASSESPEGGS X ACE & TATE SUNGLASSESAce Tate exclusiveblog-0848Ace Tate exclusiveblog-0841PEGGS X ACE & TATE SUNGLASSES

INTERVIEW: RUSS GATOR FROM TSPTR

INTERVIEW: RUSS GATOR FROM TSPTR

INTERVIEW: RUSS GATOR FROM TSPTR

Americana has always held a special place in streetwear and menswear communities. Iconic cartoon characters such as Popeye and Betty Boop have found themselves sitting next to Supreme logos, vintage military pieces and varsity jackets are as relevant as ever and the American influence on Japanese brands such as Neighborhood and orSlow is evident season after season.

Here in the UK we have embraced American culture more than most and one brand that truly embodies the independent spirit of the States is London based TSPTR. Hugely influenced by both ‘60s and ‘70s pop and counter culture, TSPTR combine well known icons, those such as Taxi Driver’s psychotic Travis Bickle, with military and collegiate influences. The result is clothing that pays respect to the past yet retains a contemporary twist.

INTERVIEW: RUSS GATOR FROM TSPTR

While TSPTR draw inspiration from a variety of different sources, one thing that has had a huge influence on the brand are the characters from Charles M. Schulz’s Peanuts. While it may be easy for some to dismiss the comic strip as merely a cartoon, Schulz’s creation has long had a significant cultural impact ever since its publication in 1950. TSPTR’s admiration goes far beyond a simple homage to a beloved American classic, they use Schulz’s shrewd social commentary as the basis for many of their recent collections.

“Schultz is hugely relevant in the sense that his work subtly, and at times explicitly, engaged with many serious national issues,” explains TSPTR founder Russ Gator. “The 1960s were a turbulent decade for the United States, the assassination of JFK in 1963 signaled the beginning of a period of massive social upheaval and Schulz’s work began to channel the anxieties of many average Americans.  The Peanuts characters came to embody Americans’ serious concerns about the real world, allowing readers to consider and debate these issues through an unlikely medium.”

INTERVIEW: RUSS GATOR FROM TSPTR

During the ‘60s Peanuts grew into mainstream success and became the most read comic strip in America. This gave Schulz a national platform for his social and political commentary that turned the likes of Charlie Brown and Snoopy into unassuming activists for social change. However, the counter culture potential of Peanuts was not fully realised until 1967 when Schulz’s growing resentment of the Vietnam War became more overt.

It was 1967 when Schulz introduced the Flying Ace narrative that saw Snoopy regularly daydreaming about being a fighter pilot in World War I, chasing an enemy named the Red Baron. Although this narrative was set in the early 20th century, it cleverly mirrored the events of the war in South East Asia and acted as a subtle satirical commentary.

“The Flying Ace narrative began to focus on the soldiers who had been drafted and the tragedy of combat itself, offering mainstream endorsement to the thousands who had burned their draft cards and protested the unjustifiable war,” explains Russ. “Years later he laid his personal feelings out on the page with Snoopy participating in a protest and riot against the Vietnam War.”

INTERVIEW: RUSS GATOR FROM TSPTR

Schulz’s criticism of the war made it over to the American troops in Vietnam and the Peanuts characters became unofficial mascots of the soldiers growing discontent and resentment. As an act of rebellion towards a war they no longer believed in, they painted the characters on military gear, including their planes and uniforms.

“They appeared on many unofficial unit insignia such as patches, helmet art and Zippo lighters, often exclaiming their disapproval of being shipped halfway around the world to fight someone else’s war,” explains Russ. “Snoopy in particular served on the helmets of assault helicopter pilots and on the noses of combat aircrafts alongside such anti war statements as rainbows, peace signs and slogans such as ‘Draft LBJ’.”

This civil act of defiance is a huge source of inspiration for TSPTR, so much so that the brand regularly pay tribute to it throughout their collections: “This period is really at the core of the brand’s ethos, so much social and political change happened between the mid ‘60s and mid ‘70s, it’s a fascinating time to focus on.”

INTERVIEW: RUSS GATOR FROM TSPTR

When it came time to choose the graphics for the exclusive Peggs & son collaboration with TSPTR the choice was clear. The Peanuts characters are a classic motif with a strong message behind them that is still relevant today. Couple this with Brighton’s thriving skateboarding scene and love of all things vintage, and the result perfectly sums up the city.

You can shop the Brighton capsule collection, our homage to one of the most influential contributors to American popular and counter culture, in store and online now.

 

Words and images: George Metcalf

POP TRADING COMPANY

POP TRADING COMPANY

POP TRADING COMPANY

Based out of Amsterdam, Pop Trading Company are all about creating functional basics with a streetwear edge. Born from the skate parks of the Dutch capital, their use of subtle branding and premium materials results in a collection that is refreshingly refined in its execution.

Taking classic menswear staples such as long sleeve tees and sweatshirts, there is an unmistakable urban approach to their design philosophy, one that blends pared back silhouettes with muted colourways. A highlight for us is the Sportswear 1/4 Zip Sweatshirt in teal, a simple number that has been based around a smock style. Cut from 100% cotton, it features a regular fit, zip placket and Pop Trading Company logo detailing completes the look.

We also love their accessories; small bags that are both versatile and hardwearing. For those that dislike bulky backpacks, be sure to take a look Hip Bag and Pop Passport Holder. The Hip Bag is utilitarian in its aesthetic and perfect for everyday use thanks to its size. An adjustable strap, ripstop construction, black colourway, multiple pockets and subtle stitched logo detailing complete the look. Take a look at the collection in full in the images below…

POP TRADING COMPANY POP TRADING COMPANY POP TRADING COMPANY POP TRADING COMPANY POP TRADING COMPANY POP TRADING COMPANY POP TRADING COMPANY

Shop the new collection from Pop Trading Company either in store or online now…

SUMMER SUNGLASSES

SUMMER SUNGLASSES

Summer sunglasses

Is there a more quintessential summer item than sunglasses? With the double benefit of making you look cool and protecting your eyes, every man needs a great pair. Fortunately here in store we have a wide selection to choose from.

Below we run through some of our favourite styles both classic and contemporary. First up we have Swedish label Sun Buddies (pink background) who are know for their quality acetate frames that reference iconic styles that they pair with unusual and bold colourways. Next is Le Specs, a label that despite their name hail from Australia (green/blue background). From classic aviators to riffs on wayfarers, their selection is perfect for those who value individuality.

A new brand to us here at Peggs & son is Ace & Tate (grey background). Based out of the Netherlands, they craft lightweight, highly wearable eyewear. The styles we have in store are updates on classics and we especially like the Monty with its pearly white frames. Last but not least we have YMC’s seasonal offerings (top image). Once again they have teamed up with Shoreditch based opticians Bridges & Brows to create refined offering. If you like classic, easy wearing shapes then be sure to take a look at their frames.

Summer sunglasses Summer sunglasses Summer sunglasses
Shop our full selection of sunglasses either in store or online now…

SUMMER CITY STYLE WITH JAKE STORY FROM OVERDILUTED

SUMMER CITY STYLE WITH JAKE STORY FROM OVERDILUTED

JAKE STORY SUMMER SHOOT

Once again we have teamed up with local Brighton menswear and lifestyle blogger Jake Story of Overdiluted to get his take on this season’s arrivals. Now that the sun is out, we took to the streets of our hometown to test some city summer looks. See more below…

There’s a distinct difference between summer style at home and what you might wear on holiday, which I feel is important to think about when it comes to buying for the current season. You don’t want a Club Tropicana style wardrobe going on when it’s 17 degrees and a bit overcast outside. Generally, we’re blessed with pretty good weather here in Brighton, but there’s always that sea breeze to contend with, which makes the straight up shorts and t-shirt look worth thinking twice about.

My rule of thumb for the summer is that when you wear shorts, opt for an extra layer or at least a long sleeve on your top half. Likewise, go for trousers that offer breathability and wear them with shorter sleeves. Sometimes, it’s even worth sizing up for t-shirts to get that extra bit of breathability along with a relaxed style… when the weather’s great, it’s all about feeling nice and comfortable.”

JAKE STORY SUMMER SHOOT JAKE STORY SUMMER SHOOTJAKE STORY SUMMER SHOOT

The Battenwear Coach Jacket is a real standout piece that’ll get wear all year round, it’s just so workable and easily layered. The CMMN Arthur Sweat I styled it with offers a nice pop of colour while the relaxed style ensures it never feels close or restricting on warmer days. I like this outfit because you could imagine it with an extra layer and some dark denim and boots for autumn/winter. That kind of longevity is always good, even YMC Sunglasses come in handy on those bright, winter days, so it’s worth trying to consider how things might work in colder climes.”

 


 

JAKE STORY SUMMER SHOOT JAKE STORY SUMMER SHOOT JAKE STORY SUMMER SHOOTJAKE STORY SUMMER SHOOT

“Pairing the light and bright YMC Malick Shirt with the Stan Ray Painter Pant offers a nice way of keeping the colours interesting while still fairly subtle, which I think is helped by the simplicity of the Aquascutum Cullen Plain Tee underneath. I’m usually pretty muted with colour, but while summer’s here, you may as well make the most of it and use it as an opportunity to experiment a little.”

 


 

JAKE STORY SUMMER SHOOT JAKE STORY SUMMER SHOOT JAKE STORY SUMMER SHOOTJAKE STORY SUMMER SHOOT

Of course, it’d be criminal not to talk about Brighton and summer without mentioning the beach. My final look is perfect for a lazy day down making the most of living right on the South Coast. Nothing crazy, just straight up gear that works well for laid back summer days, wherever they might be spent. I’m a big Armor Lux fan for the quality and price they offer and the summer variant of their Sailor Shirt is the perfect lightweight tee you’ll get loads of wear out of. The showstopper is the Porter – Yoshida Helmet Bag. It’s got that statement vibe you’d expect from Porter but still simple enough for the practicality of a day at the beach. Carrying your suncream and frisbee never looked so good.”

 

Many thanks to Jake for taking the time to put this shoot together. If you haven’t already, be sure to take a look at his Overdiluted blog. You can shop all the clothing and accessories featured in this look either in store or over on the website now.

INTERVIEW WITH CATHAL MCATEER OF FOLK

INTERVIEW WITH CATHAL MCATEER OF FOLK

INTERVIEW WITH CATHAL MCATEER OF FOLK

For 15 years British label Folk have been staging a quiet revolution in the world of menswear. Taking the principles of good design, they have made a name for themselves through crafting clothing with intricate detailing and sumptuous materials. This, combined with their use of unusual patterns and bold colours, has garnered them many fans over the years whilst at the same time spawning countless imitators.

Founder and designer Cathal McAteer has been a long time friend of the store ever since we began stocking his label over 10 years ago. As his brand celebrate an important milestone, we thought it high time to sit down with the man to discuss the history of Folk, where he finds his inspiration and what the future has in store…

 

Folk was founded some 15 years ago; can you tell us a bit about the origins of the label?

Cathal: The origins are simply my desire to make my own clothes and all the notes I had squirrelled away on how I would do it if I could. I’ve been lucky to have gotten around a bit and all my life experiences have also assisted what we do here at Folk.

You’ve had a long history with menswear, starting in Glasgow I believe?

It started with a Saturday job I had in the shop Ichi Ni San. I was 16 and we sold many many magic brands: Dries Van Noten, Joe Casely Hayford, Costume National, Helmut Lang, Vivienne Westwood. From that moment I was involved. Knee deep. At 21 I moved to London to continue learning.

Without a pot to piss in I had to bide my time and save my pennies, learn and wait for the right opportunities to fall.

You’ve become known for your detail driven design aesthetic, so much so that is has turned into somewhat of a signature. Can you explain your obsession with the minutiae?

When I first started Folk the numbers were tiny.  This meant we did not reach minimums for fabrics and had to buy everything from stock houses. With these slim pickings it was of course not the most exciting range so we had to add the spark, the something else that would get us noticed.

Using colour and detail we shaped our aesthetic. This has evolved throughout the 15 years and has become something we now do very well. That extra, the discovery after purchase.

Your ambitions to design and create extend beyond just creating clothing, you have also made furniture in the past. What is it about furniture design that fascinates you?

I love all forms of design and furniture raised its head young for me. I was completely incompetent at school so going to Art/Design School was not option. I have never really wondered what it is about furniture design that I love, I just happen to draw a lot of furniture pieces. Hopefully one day I can get more of them made.

In the past you’ve also talked about Folk becoming a design house. Do you feel you have more to say beyond the confines of clothing design?  

For sure, but that is ambitious – which I am. But my first responsibility is to insure my fashion business is working. We have so much more to give in this area.

There seems to be a conscious effort to have a cohesive voice for Folk, how much importance do you put on things like shop fits, visual merchandising and social media all fitting with the ‘Folk’ way of doing things?

From the get go we have just gotten on with making product and opening stores, but in recent years we have been careful to bring it all together. This is a constant process and as it’s not my field we enrolled someone to assist us with a singular voice. The result is that we got more fucking focused and I am hoping everyone will benefit from this. I on the other hand get a bit twitchy…

What do we have to look forward to in AW17?

A reversible, metallic hooded, wadded jacket. A magic sheepskin, some great sweats. We also have a collaborative project involving Nick & Phil Goss two very lovely and talented artists.

What does the future hold for Folk?

More and more great product. Independence. Protesting with my family. Having fun… lots and lots of fun…

 

Many thanks to Cathal for taking the time to do this interview. You can see our latest Folk selection in store and online now.

 

 

GLOBE TROTTER FACTORY VISIT

GLOBE-TROTTER FACTORY VISIT

GLOBE TROTTER FACTORY VISIT

Earlier this month we were invited by Globe-Trotter to visit their Hertfordshire factory, the place where they manufacture all of their luxury suitcases and leather goods. We’ve been big fans of the brand ever since it arrived here in store a few seasons ago. The quality of the end product is incredible, but apart from knowing they were made by hand in England, we had never given the manufacturing process too much thought.

Although the non-descript industrial estate Globe-Trotter calls home doesn’t initially live up to the brand’s glamorous reputation, the first step on to the factory floor shows the impressive scale of the operation. The airplane hanger sized factory is split roughly into two sections, one that deals with bags, small leather goods and special custom orders and the other dedicated to the manufacture of their celebrated cases.

Immediately it is obvious how much dedication and skill goes into the production of each and every product. Wherever you look, highly skilled craftspeople are milling around, using both modern and Victorian era machinery to mould, trim, stitch and rivet. The true meaning of ‘made by hand’ starts to dawn on you as you see leather being stripped to just the right thickness, handles being cut and pressed, hinges being hammered into place and metal accessories all being individually painted and polished. The number of processes taking place must number in the hundreds; a truly staggering amount of high precision work.

The raw materials play an imperative part of the manufacturing process. Leather, sourced from some of the finest tanneries in the UK, is chosen carefully. Hides free of blemishes are highly prized as it gives a superior finish, but on show in towering racks are all kind of kinds of leather in a multitude of bold colours and intricate patterns ready for custom orders. The large sheets of super-strong vulcanised fibreboard that Globe-Trotter has made its name from are being cut, again by hand, before being passed onto the next craftsperson who masterfully bends them around the strong frames.

Scattered throughout the factory are reminders of Globe-Trotter’s 120 year history. Machines that were used during World War II to make gas mask cases are still in use. A Victorian era guillotine stands next to its contemporary cousin. A particularly heavyweight instrument comes in the form of a press, forcing leather circles into concave triangles to be used as the iconic corner protectors. This has been in almost daily use for close to 100 years.

But modernity also plays a key role in production. A machine that trims sheets of leather down by millimetres at a time is high tech and precise. Its operator tells us that a similar machine is used to shave pork fat down to incredible levels of thinness. This then gets placed on gauzes to be used by doctors to treat burn victims.

As well as the vintage machinery, the rich and illustrious history of the brand is on show everywhere. The collaborations, from everyone such as Maison Martin Margiela to Chivas Regal, serve as testament to the Globe-Trotter brand. But it is the personalised cases that litter the workshops upper floor that tell their own stories. Names of celebrities, musicians, film stars and actors pepper the cases showing just how sought after Globe-Trotters have become.

It was a rare and enjoyable glimpse into English manufacturing, something that has all but disappeared in recent decades. Seeing a product of such quality made from scratch by hand was incredibly impressive and is testament to the skills and craftsmanship we as a country still possess.

See our images below for a look into the making of one of England’s true luxury products.

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Many thanks to James, Nathan and the whole Globe-Trotter team for showing us around. You can take a look at our Globe-Trotter selection either in store or online now.