Author Archives: Charlie Haywood

PATAGONIA ARE SUING TRUMP

PATAGONIA ARE SUING TRUMP

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PATAGONIA ARE SUING TRUMP

American outdoors label Patagonia have always been ones to stand up for what they believe in. Having donated millions of dollars to grass roots environmental causes, last year they began legal action against Trump, filing a lawsuit in protest of his decision to remove protections for Bears Ears national monument in Utah. ⠀

Critics say that the move by the US President will result in some two million acres losing federal protection and could pave the way for private ownership and exploitation of previously public land.⠀

As well as being vocal critics of Trump in the past, Patagonia also donate 1% of all annual sales to environmental causes, a figure that was close to $10million in 2017, and have launched projects to encourage customers to repair and recycle their old gear.⠀

For us, Patagonia are a model for how fashion businesses can operate ethically and sustainably whilst still producing incredible clothing. As ethics and the environment become more prominent in consumers’ minds, Patagonia are at the very forefront of this movement and represent what a progressive clothing company can and should be.

HOW TO MAKE A SUNSPEL TEE: WE VISIT SUNSPEL'S FACTORY

HOW TO MAKE A SUNSPEL TEE: WE VISIT SUNSPEL’S FACTORY

HOW TO MAKE A SUNSPEL TEE: WE VISIT SUNSPEL'S FACTORY

We’ve long been aware of the quality of Sunspel’s made in England tees. Just getting your hands on one immediately reveals a lustrous finish and soft handle that puts them head and shoulders above the competition.

We’d also heard about the long staple cotton yarns used in construction, the fastidious attention to detail and the unrivalled craftsmanship. But these terms are abstract concepts, hard to gauge and difficult to fully grasp without a detailed knowledge of clothing production.

So when we were invited to Sunspel’s factory and design studio in Long Eaton, Derbyshire, we immediately booked our train tickets and revelled in the chance in the learn more about the creation of our favourite t-shirts.

 


 

It’s easy to lose sight of our manufacturing heritage down here in Brighton. Our main industries seem to be tourism and digital marketing, the result of which is more coffee shops and vegan brunch spots than seem necessary. So a trip up to Long Eaton was a great reminder that a world beyond cortados and chia seeds exists, a place where businesses and factories still produce tangible products.

HOW TO MAKE A SUNSPEL TEE: WE VISIT SUNSPEL'S FACTORY HOW TO MAKE A SUNSPEL TEE: WE VISIT SUNSPEL'S FACTORY HOW TO MAKE A SUNSPEL TEE: WE VISIT SUNSPEL'S FACTORY

We were met at Nottingham station by Universal Works’ founder David Keyte who kindly dropped us at the Sunspel headquarters on his way to another local factory where he was getting knitwear samples produced. Down a road of terraced houses, 200 metres from the banks of the River Erewash was the saw tooth roof of the Sunspel factory, still standing in the same place it has been for over 100 years.

We were met by John Mart, production/sourcing manager, a man who knows everything there is to know about the creation of finely crafted English t-shirts. A veteran of Sunspel for 18 years, he was the perfect person to show us around, explaining the multitude of processes, vast history and product development at Sunspel. After listening to his wise words for even a few minutes, his and Sunspel’s unwavering dedication to quality quickly became apparent.

HOW TO MAKE A SUNSPEL TEE: WE VISIT SUNSPEL'S FACTORYHOW TO MAKE A SUNSPEL TEE: WE VISIT SUNSPEL'S FACTORY

For instance, Sunspel used to source all of their long staple cotton from Egypt, a country widely regarded as producing some of the finest cotton in the world. But around five years ago, at the height of the political crisis in the country, the Sunspel factory began noticing a reduction in quality. Slight white flecking was appearing, affecting the uptake of dye. The factory ran tests and discovered that the result of this flecking was down to immature cotton being picked before it was ready. Unable to tolerate this dip in quality, they scoured the globe before finally being satisfied with the quality of cotton from California.

 


 

Making a t-shirt is a very long, very involved procedure. As well as negotiating complicated geo-political issues when sourcing, what you do with the raw materials once you’ve acquired them impacts on the finished product.

Only long staple cotton, those with individual strands typically around two inches, is used. Everything else is rejected to be used by other clothing manufacturers with less discerning taste. This yarn, smooth and lustrous, is then twisted with another to create a strong, dense weave that takes on dye exceptionally well. Once dyed, the finished cloth is then shipped to the Long Eaton factory ready to be turned into the iconic tees that are beloved by everyone from Bond to Batman.

HOW TO MAKE A SUNSPEL TEE: WE VISIT SUNSPEL'S FACTORY HOW TO MAKE A SUNSPEL TEE: WE VISIT SUNSPEL'S FACTORY HOW TO MAKE A SUNSPEL TEE: WE VISIT SUNSPEL'S FACTORY

After an initial inspection (the first of many, many quality control checks), it is handed to a pattern cutter for marking and cutting. Using an extra sharp saw that wouldn’t look out of place in a joiner’s workshop, she cuts each panel, creating the building blocks that will eventually become the finished product.

This stage is crucial as any errors here will throw off production further down the line. These cloth panels are then distributed to several seamstresses, all with a highly specialised set of skills and tools who go to work overlocking, marking and stitching. One particularly fiddly part is the creation and attaching of the collar. First a seamstress cuts cotton into a precise width that is rolled onto a spindle. This roll of two-inch-wide cotton is then taken from one machine and placed onto another that feeds it through a device that folds it neatly before a needle stitches it around the unfinished collar of the front and back t-shirt panels.

The process is quick, intricate and miraculous. An innocuous strip of fabric is turned, as if my magic, into a perfectly formed, beautifully stitched collar. A t-shirt is beginning to form.

HOW TO MAKE A SUNSPEL TEE: WE VISIT SUNSPEL'S FACTORY HOW TO MAKE A SUNSPEL TEE: WE VISIT SUNSPEL'S FACTORY

After a quick fire rally of stitching, hemming, trimming, steaming and ironing, all that is left is to fold each tee and slip it into its packaging. All along the way quality control checks have been taking place. Fabric is weighed, off cuts are checked for extraneous wastage, time sheets are checked and forms filled out. The finished tees, batched up into boxes, pass through a metal detector to check for any broken sewing needles before a single tee is plucked at random from every dozen or so boxes to be sent to quality control for inspection. A last check in a long line of compliance procedures.

 


 

Watching anything get made this intricately is always a pleasure. The cumulative experience and skill of the women who operate the factory floor is remarkable and this translates into a product that really is something very special.

HOW TO MAKE A SUNSPEL TEE: WE VISIT SUNSPEL'S FACTORY HOW TO MAKE A SUNSPEL TEE: WE VISIT SUNSPEL'S FACTORYHOW TO MAKE A SUNSPEL TEE: WE VISIT SUNSPEL'S FACTORY

The fact that this type of production has been in rapid decline is even more reason to cherish it. We seem to be proud of our manufacturing past here in Britain, yet we have idly watched it disappear. Rising costs, cheaper international alternatives and an economy more focused on providing the world with financial services than physical products have all been to blame.

But when something is made as good here as anywhere else on the planet, we should all sit up and take notice.

HOW TO MAKE A SUNSPEL TEE: WE VISIT SUNSPEL'S FACTORY

Many thanks to John and Michael for taking the time to show us around the factory floor. Photography: James Hole

ON THE BEACH: OUR SS18 EDITORIAL

ON THE BEACH: OUR SS18 EDITORIAL

ON THE BEACH: OUR SS18 EDITORIAL

Inspired by Neil Young’s iconic 1974 album of the same name, we present On The Beach, our SS18 Editorial. Featuring some key pieces from the latest collections by visvim, Barena, Our Legacy, Stone Island Shadow Project, Engineered Garments, Danton and Stan Ray, the selection has been chosen to reflect the long, lazy summer days that lie ahead.

Checks, stripes, tribal prints and floral patterns feature heavily but have been paired with more subdued pieces such as military jackets, shop jackets and linen blazers to offer versatility throughout the summer months. These are outfits put together with the beach and the town in mind, perfect for holidays where you don’t want to be laden with carrying layers around with you. Effortless and relaxed, just the way summer should be…

You can shop all of our the items in this Editorial by heading in store or over to our website now.

ON THE BEACH: OUR SS18 EDITORIAL ON THE BEACH: OUR SS18 EDITORIAL ON THE BEACH: OUR SS18 EDITORIAL ON THE BEACH: OUR SS18 EDITORIAL ON THE BEACH: OUR SS18 EDITORIALON THE BEACH: OUR SS18 EDITORIAL ON THE BEACH: OUR SS18 EDITORIALON THE BEACH: OUR SS18 EDITORIALON THE BEACH: OUR SS18 EDITORIAL

Photography: James Hole and Charlie Haywood.

INTERVIEW: TSUBASA TAMAKI FROM DANTON

INTERVIEW: TSUBASA TAMAKI FROM DANTON

INTERVIEW: DANTON'S TSUBASA TAMAKI

A classic French workwear brand, adopted by a small Japanese label keen to recreate iconic cuts using modern materials: the story of DANTON had us hooked from the moment we heard about it. We caught up with the man behind DANTON’s rebirth, Tsubasa Tamaki, to discuss the past, present and future of a label that has quickly become a store favourite.

 


P&s: We’ve only had DANTON in store for one season, can you give us a little introduction to who you are, what DANTON is about and what attracted you to work with the label in the first place?

TT: For me, DANTON has a unique style and a long history having been established in Paris in 1935. Now my label/store, BOY’S Co., is producing everything. We oversee all aspects of the brand from design and manufacture to sales and distribution. We wanted to work with DANTON’s history and keep the traditional style, but bring Japanese quality to the whole production to help elevate the range.

That’s why DANTON has been doing really well in a number of markets and that is also one of the attractions for me. To be able to take something with a rich and diverse history and update it for a modern audience using new materials.

INTERVIEW: DANTON'S TSUBASA TAMAKI

How did you get into menswear/retail? Have you always had a desire to work in fashion?

As I have been crazy about fashion since I was a junior high school student, getting into this job felt completely natural. I have been working in fashion wholesale since the beginning of my career. Right after I graduated from Japanese fashion school, I got into a company that focused on cut and sew wholesale, targeting the mass market in Japan. That was my first job and I worked here for a number of years before I finally joined BOY’S Co.

How do you go about creating a modern approach for DANTON but still remain faithful to the brand’s history?

We are always researching the latest trends and movements within the fashion market from major cities such as Tokyo, New York, London, Milan and Paris. We then distil what we find and try to incorporate this into our products.

This approach helps maintain the feeling and roots of the label, but at the same time it incorporates the essence of the latest trends in fashion.

INTERVIEW: DANTON'S TSUBASA TAMAKI

When you design new collections, do you have a particular man in mind?

DANTON has been designed for working people so therefore it has been made with many different kinds of men in mind. We want to add new detailing and experiment with modern materials but overall we try and stay true to the original designs and ethos of the label.

Bringing production to Japan has also changed the way we approach design. We like to add details that we think the Japanese customer would like, giving a fresh perspective to an old garment, breathing new life into it and adapting it for the modern day.

What’s in store for the future of DANTON?

All I can say is that DANTON will stay functional, reasonable and fashionable. We want the brand to stick to its tradition but utilise high quality Japanese craftsmanship that will appeal to many kinds of people. We will continue to look at the rich heritage of the label and explore their archives and history in order to find inspiration.

INTERVIEW: DANTON'S TSUBASA TAMAKI

Many thanks to Tsubasa for taking the time to come visit the store and sit down to answer our questions. You can shop the latest DANTON collection in store and by visiting the online shop.

Photography: James Hole

IN STORE WITH THE NUDIE JEANS MOBILE REPAIR STATION

IN STORE WITH THE NUDIE JEANS MOBILE REPAIR STATION

IN STORE WITH THE NUDIE JEANS MOBILE REPAIR STATION

Worn out crotches, frayed hems and ripped thighs typically seal the fate of denim. After many months of wear, these issues often signal the end of life for jeans and the beginning of a journey to find a new pair.

The alternative, repairing them, is often overlooked by people. Either they lack the necessary skills with a sewing machine or they don’t trust a tailor, who may not be a denim specialist, with their beloved pair of jeans.

Clocking on to this desire to repair rather that replace, the guys at Nudie set up a Repair Station in their flagship London store where customers could get any issues fixed for free. Here their team of trained denim wizards could fix all manner of problems with the proper materials and machinery. But with wait times of up to eight weeks, there was a desire to get the operation out of the store and on to the road and we were fortunate enough to be the first shop to host the inaugural Mobile Repair Station.

With sewing machine and denim patches in tow, the Nudie guys set up at the front of our store to give passers by a chance to see denim repairs being on the spot. The response was great but if you missed out this time then good news, the Nudie Jeans Mobile Repair Station will be returning to the store in the not too distant future…

IN STORE WITH THE NUDIE JEANS MOBILE REPAIR STATION IN STORE WITH THE NUDIE JEANS MOBILE REPAIR STATION IN STORE WITH THE NUDIE JEANS MOBILE REPAIR STATION IN STORE WITH THE NUDIE JEANS MOBILE REPAIR STATION IN STORE WITH THE NUDIE JEANS MOBILE REPAIR STATION IN STORE WITH THE NUDIE JEANS MOBILE REPAIR STATION IN STORE WITH THE NUDIE JEANS MOBILE REPAIR STATION

SPRING STYLE: STRIPES

SPRING STYLE: STRIPES

SPRING STYLE: STRIPES

It could be the change in seasons or the effects of the sun’s rays, but there’s something about the first signs of spring weather that makes us want to crack out the bold patterned tees and striped shirts from our wardrobe. With thoughts of long summer days on the horizon, you really can’t beat a classic Breton or simple pinstripe.

One nation synonymous with the stripe is France, and Lyon based label Arpenteur have come through with the goods this season. Although French brands are typically associated with the iconic Breton pattern, a style initially developed to commemorate Napoleon’s military victories, Arpenteur have switched it up, flipping the stripes through 90 degrees to create a vertical lined extravaganza in the form of their Pyjama Shirt.

Not ones to be left out, English label Sunspel have also muscled in on the stripe action with their S/S Striped Crew Tee. A luxe take on a wardrobe staple, it has been crafted using the finest long staple Egyptian cotton to give an incredibly soft handle. This is a spring standard, pair it with washed jeans, smart chinos and, if the weather is on your side, a pair of shorts for an effortless and relaxed look.

The great Danes, Norse Projects, are also partial to a stripe or two and this season they have produced the James Logo Tee, a long sleeve tee that comes in a variety of colourways. Minimalism, a core concept at the centre of all Norse Projects’ designs, can be seen in the restrained use of detailing, subtle branding and use of premium materials.

Below we have featured some of our top spring stripe picks, but you can shop more styles over on our website now.

SPRING STYLE: STRIPESSPRING STYLE: STRIPESSPRING STYLE: STRIPESSPRING STYLE: STRIPES

NUDIE JEANS MOBILE REPAIR STATION IN STORE EVENT

NUDIE JEANS MOBILE REPAIR STATION AT PEGGS & SON

NUDIE JEANS MOBILE REPAIR STATION IN STORE EVENT

Have your pair of Nudie Jeans seen better days? Perhaps a tear in the thigh or a rip in the crotch? Well, we have good news for you. On the 13th and 14th of April we welcome the Nudie Jeans Mobile Repair Station to the store. The denim wizards from the repair department of Nudie Jeans will be on hand to give your tired jeans a new lease of life.

And the best bit? It’s all completely FREE.

In the past Nudie Jeans have only offered this service at their London shop so it is great to be the first ever store to welcome the Mobile Repair Station. Make sure you get down to our shop early on the Friday or the Saturday to get your repair booked in.

In the meantime, why not take a look at the selection of Nudie Jeans we have in stock over on our website…

Folk X Peggs party at MEATliquor

FOLK X PEGGS PARTY AT MEATLIQUOR

Folk X Peggs party at MEATliquor

We’d been trying to find an excuse to have another party at MEATliquor Brighton ever since we’d recovered from the Edwin celebration a few years back. Then it suddenly dawned on us that this year will mark a decade of stocking British label Folk at the store and a plan was swiftly formed. To celebrate the occasion we also teamed up with three of our favourite local artists, Mark Vessey, ILOVEDUST and Ryan Gillett, to create a limited selection of tees with all profit going to local charity Amaze.

Below are some photos of the night and a huge thanks to everyone who turned up,  there were some sore heads this on the shop floor the following morning. A massive thank you to all the guys at MEATliquor for making it such a great night!

If you were there then post your photos on Instagram with the hashtag #FolkXPeggs, we’d love to see them.

Folk X Peggs party at MEATliquor Folk X Peggs party at MEATliquor Folk X Peggs party at MEATliquor Folk X Peggs party at MEATliquor Folk X Peggs party at MEATliquor Folk X Peggs party at MEATliquor Folk X Peggs party at MEATliquor Folk X Peggs party at MEATliquor Folk X Peggs party at MEATliquor Folk X Peggs party at MEATliquor Folk X Peggs party at MEATliquor Folk X Peggs party at MEATliquor

FOLK X PEGGS ARTIST TEES: ILOVEDUST INTERVIEW

FOLK X PEGGS ARTIST TEES: ILOVEDUST INTERVIEW

FOLK X PEGGS ARTIST TEES: ILOVEDUST INTERVIEW

To celebrate 10 years of stocking Folk here at Peggs & son, we’ve teamed up with some of our favourite artists to create a capsule collection of artist tees. The three designs, from Mark Vessey, ILOVEDUST and Ryan Gillett, will be launched to coincide with our party at MEATliquor on March 20th (which you can RSVP by clicking here) and all profits will be given to local charity Amaze.

Following Mark Vessey we have ILOVEDUST, a Brighton based design team that have worked with some of the biggest names in the fashion, tech and sports industries. They specialise in design concepts, brand identity and experimental artwork across a range of mediums and the work they produce is always eye-catching and unique.

We caught up with Mark Graham from the team to talk about how they got their break, the challenges of working with some of the world’s largest clients and what advice he has for up and coming designers.

 


 

P&s: How did ILOVEDUST begin?

ILD: We started out 14 years ago doing anything and everything we could get our hands. From local band artwork to tool box catalogues, porn ads and anything in between, we just wanted to get our name out there and gain some experience in the industry.

FOLK X PEGGS ARTIST TEES: ILOVEDUST INTERVIEW

You do a lot of commercial work with larger brands, can you list some of the people you have worked with? 

We pretty much work with our dream client list in all honesty. We do a ton of work for Nike and their football and basketball categories as well as their Jordan brand which is nothing short of a stellar line up on its own. We also do a lot of creative work for Red Bull, Xbox and just recently we have started working with the England squad and the FA. But as a studio it’s very important for us to take on smaller creative briefs too so we work on little drinks brands and interesting interior spaces for example too.

 

How much of a challenge is it working with large clients, are you given the freedom to explore different approaches or are you often confined to a brief? 

Every client has its challenges and sometimes knowing that larger brands have more branding guidelines in place often actually helps us concentrate on what’s important rather than have a brief that is too open. A ‘do anything you like’ brief sounds like a dream but rarely does that actually equate to the reality once we show the client. Design is so subjective it can be difficult to please all of the people all of the time to be honest. And a safe middle ground isn’t really our style.

FOLK X PEGGS ARTIST TEES: ILOVEDUST INTERVIEW

You have 27 members all with different approaches, how do you balance this? 

It’s actually of now 34 so it is even harder to balance! But we have a great team ethic and our crüe is held together by all wanting to get the best work out of our studio. Having our project manager bring support and reality to briefs has been essential in navigating our success of late and they keep us all nice and steady and on track.

 

Is there an underpinning design/aesthetic philosophy for ILOVEDUST?

We like to tell stories and we like to obsess the detail in our work whenever we can. It’s nice to have some layers to our creative approach.

 

Do you have any advice for aspiring graphic designers?

If you know something, it’s that you know nothing. Plus a cup of coffee is an essential piece of the process.

FOLK X PEGGS ARTIST TEES: ILOVEDUST INTERVIEW

Many thanks to Jay and Mark from ILOVEDUST for taking the time to answer our questions. You can take a closer look at their work here. Their Folk X Peggs Artist Series tee will be available at our MEATliquor party and on the site shortly with all proceeds going to local Brighton charity, Amaze.

FOLK X PEGGS ARTIST TEES: RYAN GILLETT INTERVIEW

FOLK X PEGGS ARTIST TEES: RYAN GILLETT INTERVIEW

FOLK X PEGGS ARTIST TEES: RYAN GILLETT INTERVIEW

To celebrate 10 years of stocking Folk here at Peggs & son, we’ve teamed up with some of our favourite artists to create a capsule collection of artist tees. The three designs, from Mark Vessey, ILOVEDUST and Ryan Gillett, will be launched to coincide with our party at MEATliquor on March 20th (which you can RSVP by clicking here) and all profits will be given to local charity Amaze.

Next up we have Brighton based freelance illustrator Ryan Gillett. We love his quirky, irreverent work that always looks at life from a positive, humorous angle. Ryan has been a friend of the store for a while, helping us out with illustrations during our early years and it’s great to finally work with him on a project that sees his imagery on a garment.

 


 

P&s: Can you briefly introduce yourself?

RG: Hi! I’m a freelance graphic artist/illustrator working and living in Brighton for just under ten years now. My favourite past times involve hanging with my four legged friends, drinking coffee, collecting records and seeking out vintage clobber.

FOLK X PEGGS ARTIST TEES: RYAN GILLETT INTERVIEW

You have quite an irreverent, playful style, where do you get your inspiration from? 

I’ve always looked on the bright side of life and have never been one to take things too seriously. I take every day mundane things and spruce them up with exaggerated features, whimsical colours and a ton of imagination. I love taking things out of context and placing them in a surreal environment to elaborate the mood of the drawing.

 

How do you go about creating your work, do you start with a rough sketch on paper and build from there?

My usual practice involves aimlessly pencil sketching until something of relevance emerges. I then doodle numerous variations until I find one I’m super happy with. From there I experiment with colour, layering up the image much like you would in screen printing.

FOLK X PEGGS ARTIST TEES: RYAN GILLETT INTERVIEW

Are we right in saying that you feature heavily in your own work? Do your draw inspiration from your own life?

It’s common to stumble upon a big nosed feller with short back and sides in my illustrations – I see it as a different approach to taking a selfie. I like to imagine myself in the picture just to step out of reality for a brief second, running over a river of crocodiles is a lot more exciting than sitting at desk sipping a cold cup of tea.

 

Can you talk a bit about the design you created for us?

The concept behind my t-shirt represents hopes and dreams. Every now and then I come across a surfer paddling out to sea, searching for a wave that doesn’t really exist on Brighton Beach. Everyone has a dream, for this gnarly surfer dude it’s to get totally tubular in a wave represented by the little guy in his hair.

FOLK X PEGGS ARTIST TEES: RYAN GILLETT INTERVIEW

Can you list some on the clients you have worked with? 

In the past few years I’ve worked with brands such as Nike, Virgin, EasyJet, The Sunday Times and Lucky Peach alongside various other commissions. Most recently I worked for Hato Studio and D&AD on their ‘Start with a Mark’ campaign. I created various 3D images to be part of the 2018 D&AD festival identity alongside starring in a How To tutorial video.

 

How much of a challenge is it working with clients, are you given the freedom to explore different approaches or are you often confined to a brief?

Working towards a brief is great fun. It takes you out of your natural thinking pattern, sparking your imagination in ways that wouldn’t usually occur. Sometimes having creative freedom can be overwhelming, being aided by a brief can help narrow down your ideas and really focus on what the client really wants.

FOLK X PEGGS ARTIST TEES: RYAN GILLETT INTERVIEW

A huge thanks to Ryan Gillett for taking the time to answer our questions. You can take a look at more of his artwork by clicking here. His Folk X Peggs Artists Series Tee is now available over on our site.